10 Things I Learned From Running a Group Practice the Past 5 Years | GP 34

10 Things I Learned From Running a Group Practice the Past 5 Years: GP 34

Are you interested in growing your group practice? What are some of the foundations of a successful group practice? What are some important aspects to consider?

In this podcast episode, Alison Pidgeon speaks about 10 lessons she learned from running a group practice for the past 5 years.

In This Podcast

Summary

  1. Taking calculated risks
  2. Surround yourself with people who support and encourage you
  3. Not letting excuses get in your way
  4. Investing time and money into business coaching and consulting
  5. Writing down values for the business and creating a positive workspace for staff
  6. Not thinking of failure
  7. Creating self-sustaining systems and processes
  8. Letting go of distractions
  9. Treating staff well
  10. Following through on what you say you will do

1. Taking calculated risks

Sometimes you have to take a leap of faith and take a risk for the sake of your practice. Allow yourself to try new things and take calculated risks without putting too much pressure on yourself. Recognize that it is a scary process, and then do it anyway.

2. Surround yourself with people who support and encourage you

You may have people in your life who support you by cheering you on, and then there may be others who want to support you but bring in doubt into the situation. Move past them and get to the people who will give you encouragement and who will believe in you, because you may be giving yourself enough doubt as it is.

Seek out the people who push you towards your goals because it is an incredibly powerful force, sincere encouragement.

3. Not letting excuses get in your way

It is easy to say that you do not have enough time or that you lack the necessary funds to expand, or that you do not have the resources to take on more clinicians.

Excuses provide you with the perfect smokescreen to hide behind when in reality, you may just be doubtful and afraid of the risk.

If I ran into an obstacle, I’d just find a way to make it work and I know so many people who, when they run into an obstacle, they’re like ‘oh, this is the sign that I’m not meant to do this’ or ‘this is proof that I shouldn’t keep on following through’, and I think the opposite. How badly do you want this? How badly are you willing to work to make it work for you?

If you encounter a problem, keep asking questions and looking for a way around it. It may take some time but you can find a way.

4. Investing time and money into business coaching and consulting

Business consulting can greatly assist you in scaling up your practice. Since I started my business consulting in 2016, it has helped me immensely and enabled me to upscale my practice and expand it. Business consulting can help you to look at the structure of your group practice and find ways in which to improve it and then expand it further.

5. Writing down values for the business and creating a positive workspace for staff

Businesses usually have mission statements that serve as their underlying goals to achieve. Writing down values is similar to how a person has principles that they live by, and physically writing them down and having them on hand to remind you of how you want your business to run, and what you want to accomplish, will assist you in your decision-making process.

Then when you need to make big decisions, you can check yourself and see if what you are considering for your group practice aligns with the values that you have set out for it.

You can also use these values during your hiring process, to see if a new clinician that you are considering hiring would be a good fit and can live out these values within your group practice. By hiring people that align with the group practice values and treating them with respect and care, your practice will grow.

6. Not thinking of failure

When I started my practice, I did not consider the possibility of failure and worked with a growth mindset. When you encounter an obstacle or you need assistance, ask for it and keep trying to figure out how to move around the problems that may come up. There will be fear involved but do not stop working just because fear is present, push past it, and keep going.

7. Creating self-sustaining systems and processes

When you create systems that are self-sustainable and can be easily replicated, your group practice will move forward like a well-oiled machine that you need only tinker on here or there.

Work out the kinks and make the mistakes early on, but learn from them, so that when it comes to hiring more clinicians or expanding the office, your system stays secure and can simply be replicated in another facility.

Delegate work and have people in your group practice keep certain responsibilities so that everyone works as a team, and so that you do not have an exponentially increasing workload that falls on your plate.

8. Letting go of distractions

Do a time study throughout a week and track where you spend your time and how much, for whatever you do, whether its social media, watching the news, dealing with emails or family responsibilities, and so forth. Take a hard look at them and see what you can eliminate to free up time.

This will give you an idea of where you place most of your efforts, and where you are perhaps mismanaging some time that you can potentially free up for yourself or redirect into your other priorities.

9. Treating staff well

When you care for your staff and make them your top priority, they will deliver excellent services and care to their clients and when the clients appreciate the service they send referrals, so the practice can expand – this is why it is important to treat yourself well.

Do kind things for them that show you are thinking of them, allow some perks with no strings attached that they can enjoy in the office. Give them responsibility and autonomy to allow them to be comfortable while functioning under your group practice and the values that you have laid out as guidelines.

10. Following through on what you say you will do

Respond and do not leave things hanging. Even if someone asks a request of you and your answer is no, it is still important to get back to them promptly. In doing this, your clinicians and clients will trust you and will know that you actually want to help them and take their concerns to heart.

Books mentioned in this episode

Useful Links:

Meet Alison Pidgeon

Alison Pidgeon | Grow A Group Practice PodcastAlison is a serial entrepreneur with four businesses, one of which is a 15 clinician group practice. She’s also a mom to three boys, wife, coffee drinker, and loves to travel. She started her practice in 2015 and, four years later, has two locations. With a specialization in women’s issues, the practices have made a positive impact on the community by offering different types of specialties not being offered anywhere else in the area.

Alison has been working with Practice of the Practice since 2016 and has helped over 70 therapist entrepreneurs start and grow their businesses, through mastermind groups and individual consulting.

Thanks For Listening!

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