Create your own Software as a Service with Geordie Wardman | PoP 483

Create your own Software as a Service with Geordie Wardman | PoP 483

Are you looking for ways to increase productivity? Which of your repetitive tasks can be automated to save you time and money? Do you have an idea for an app that could help you reach more people and potentially get more clients?

In this podcast episode, Joe Sanok speaks to Geordie Wardman about creating your own software as a service.

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Meet Geordie Wardman

Geordie Wardman has been an entrepreneur since 2006. He used to jump out of airplanes to put out forest fires in the Western US, Canada and Alaska. He fought fires for 8 years, until he made it to the top of the firefighting world, and realized he couldn’t make it any higher.

He started 5 companies, exited from 3. He is still running two; onestopdevshop a software and design agency and wavereview, an online review engine.

Visit Geordie’s websites: Onestopdevshop and Wavereview.

Connect on Twitter, LinkedIn, and Facebook.

In This Podcast

Summary

  • Software as a service (SAS)
  • Automating skill sets through a software service
  • Where to start when thinking about creating your own software
  • Successful marketing of a SAS

Software as a service (SAS)

Software as a service is basically any kind of software subscription service that you might pay for. It’s a much smaller commitment, you can have free trials and pay as you go so it’s not as scary for the customer. There are no contracts, you can quit any time, so it’s a really attractive model for customers to get acquainted with the software and for the software company to have a recurring revenue stream.

Automating skill sets through a software service

What are you doing on a spreadsheet, for example, that could be automated for your business? Spreadsheets are fine but they’re temporary and messy. Geordie has been tracking his time personally to see what he is actually working on. He’s going to turn this into software as a service and he can do it very easily. Something like that would cost around $5000 which he would easily be able to earn back just by being able to look at his hours in a few months. He doesn’t even need to sell this to other people to make his ROI back quickly just by making himself more efficient. You can do internal portals like a real estate company client of Geordie’s who are building an internal app for their agents to upload photos more easily. This is not software as a service but it’s a way that you can use the software in your company to make it more efficient and save company time.

Where to start when thinking about creating your own software

There’s ideas out there all the time and people have built great apps that are very, very niche specific. And you know, it’s a great business model because it’s recurring and it adds to the user base.

  • Breakdown the time and cost of tasks by looking at who touches the task and for how long. You can then work out how much that task is costing you every year and see if you can automate it for significantly less.
  • Get a consultant to come in to connect everything very easily. It will save you time, freeing you up to do more valuable things.
  • What are the core benefits of the SAS?
  • What problems are you trying to solve?
  • Are the same problems coming up over and over again with your clients?

Building a SAS could help other users to come in at a lower price. It’s a great way for practitioners to be introduced to new users who they wouldn’t have reached before. More people being drawn in potentially means more clients.

  • Build a proof of concept – it’s surprisingly affordable for someone to build a minimal viable product. It doesn’t need to be polished. Put this out to your clients to determine whether or not you should spend more money on it.
  • Don’t get carried away by features – if it’s not really solving your core problem then cut it.

Successful marketing of a SAS

  1. You need to be consistent – pick a channel and really focus on that channel. E.g. Geordie has picked content strategy and posts blogs weekly using specific keywords which he finds using tools like Ahrefs. As long as you’re consistent, you start building your audience.
  2. Send emails – Respect people, it’s not spam. You’re just asking a question so rejection is no longer an issue. Geordie sends 20 emails out a day, he could do more but then he wouldn’t be able to keep up with the leads. It can be very effective.
  3. Tracking – Metrics is key in marketing. There are multiple tools that can help you track your leads and traffic e.g. Google Analytics and reply.io

Useful Links:

Meet Joe Sanok

private practice consultant

Joe Sanok helps counselors to create thriving practices that are the envy of other counselors. He has helped counselors to grow their businesses by 50-500% and is proud of all the private practice owners that are growing their income, influence, and impact on the world. Click here to explore consulting with Joe.

Thanks For Listening!

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Podcast Transcription

[JOE]:
When it comes to keeping your practice organized, you want software that not only is simple but the best. I recommend TherapyNotes. Their platform lets you manage notes, claims, scheduling and more. Plus, they offer amazing, unlimited phone and email support. So, when you have questions, they are there to help. To get two free months of TherapyNotes today, just use promo code JOE, J-O-E, when you sign up for a free trial at therapynotes.com.

This is the Practice of the Practice podcast with Joe Sanok, session number 483.

If you just started listening to this podcast, welcome, I’m so glad you’re here. So excited to help you in as many ways as I can. And we’re going to dive into some really interesting things on today’s show. But right now Next Level Practice is open. Next Level Practice is our membership community – over 400 people that are in this – and we’re actually adding some bonuses in that we’re not even going to tell you about, because we want you to jump into Next Level Practice. But we’re going to be sending out bonuses – it’s a special thing that we’re going to be sending to you. And so not only are you going to get all the 30 plus ecourses and all of that, and the support of the membership community, and live events, and experts, but we’re also going to be adding some new things on this year. And Geordie, who I’m interviewing today, he kind of helped out with that and helps us think through some of the next level things we can do for Next Level Practice. So make sure… right now it’s open, go to practiceofthepractice.com/door if you want to go and jump right in. If you want to read more about it, it’s over at practiceofthepractice.com/invite. I almost said next level practice, which I should buy that URL. Anyway. So without any further ado, here is Geordie Wardman.

Well today on the Practice of the Practice podcast we have Geordie Wardman. Geordie has been an entrepreneur since 2006, started five companies, and exited from three. He’s still running two – One Stop Dev Shop, a software and design agency, and Wave Review, an online review engine. Geordie, welcome to the Practice of the Practice podcast.

[GEORDIE]:
How are you, Joe? I’m excited to be on the show today.

[JOE]:
Yeah, you know, I was just on your show. We recorded that, I think last week, and we got along so well. I’m like, oh, my gosh, I got to introduce you to the Practice of the Practice audience, and really came out of hearing more about software as a service. I think most people that are listening are probably like, software as a what? What are you talking about, Joe? So maybe let’s just start with what is software as a service, and then we can kind of see where the conversation goes from there?

[GEORDIE]:
Sure. Yeah. So software as a service is basically like any kind of software subscription service that you might pay for, and in a way, you could almost say that Netflix is a software as a service. It’s a monthly recurring so that it provides a service, and it’s not like something that you purchase so there might be some software… back in the day, Photoshop, you would buy Photoshop, say for $300. But now Adobe, and what people are realizing is instead of paying say $1500 for… it’s a big upfront commitment, obviously, for software, the software companies came out with these subscription models probably around 2010 or something, became really popular. And so it’s a much smaller form of commitment. You can have free trials, and it’s sort of pay as you go. So it’s not so scary for the customer to come in and make a… even if it’s free and see if they like it, and then start paying monthly, and there’s no contract – you can quit at any time. So it’s a really attractive model for the customers to come in and the users to get acquainted with the software. And for the software companies, it’s a nice recurring revenue stream because instead of having, you know, if your practice, you may have, say, ten clients or five clients, this could be possibly an added revenue stream where you may have more smaller clients that are sort of getting used to some aspect of your business and added revenue streams. Does that make sense?

[JOE]:
Yeah, so I’m thinking about, you know, TherapyNotes, one of our sponsors, and you pay a specific amount per month per user, and then they have the software that’s been helping you schedule, helping you do your notes, you know, doing HIPAA compliant video, all of that. So that would be an example of software as a service. And so those things, I think we’ve experienced those, and when we hear it now, SaaS or software as a service, it’s like, okay, that’s what that’s called. But then the leap from that’s what it is to how can I actually do that in my private practice? I’m thinking maybe some of the things to start observing – and tell me if this is what you would agree with – is what are the kind of unmet pains of my clients, or maybe my skill set, that could in some way be automated through a software service? Would that be kind of a good first question, or are there other first questions that you would have people think through?

[GEORDIE]:
Exactly. A lot of times you could think… here’s an example, like, what am I doing on a spreadsheet right now that I could automate for my business? And especially if you’re a bigger practice, spreadsheets are… they’re fine, you know, but they’re really sort of temporary. They’re messy. If you find that your business is like working on a spreadsheet a lot, I mean, that is something that can be automated. And I’ll give you a quick example on something that I’m going to build into a software as a service, is I’ve taken the habit of tracking my time – just personally – to see what am I actually working on. So let’s say I pay myself a certain amount of money, let’s say it’s $5000 or $10,000 or something, I divide that into a daily rate and then an hourly rate. So I can go through my day and see, okay, here’s something that I was spending three hours on. That’s, say, $150 of my time. Should I be working on this because it looks to me like… you know, I was messing around, for example, today, with some social media graphics and something on the [unclear] be like, I’m pretty sure that I can get that outsourced for $15 an hour, but I just wasted three hours of my time. So as a business owner, this is important for me to know. So I’m actually going to turn that into a software as a service and I can do this very easily. Now, there’s tools out there, you know, there’s Airtable, and there’s actually applications that even connect to Google Sheets, so you can build something very easily. We’re talking about thousands, not tens or twenty thousand, I can build this MVP for less than five thousand. And I’m pretty sure I’ll make my money back, just being able to look at my hours in a few months. So I don’t even need to go out and sell that to other people. I’m just going to make my ROI back quickly, just on that little app. So that’s in the [unclear].

[JOE]:
Alright. So you’re thinking about even just software that will help you be more efficient, not even just saying, I’m gonna sell this to other people, but I’m going to build something for myself that really boosts my productivity. And by doing that, it’ll save me the cost of building it.

[GEORDIE]:
Yeah. And you can do internal portals. We work with a real estate company right now in LA – they sell like $40 million industrial properties – they’re building an internal app just so that their agents can come in and upload photos more easily. And so we work with them and, you know, it’s basically time and materials, they do it as much as they want. But that’s going to make them, save them, a ton of time for their agents out in the field. They can just, you know, like, they don’t have to be messing around, moving files around. There’s a lot of legal work that’s obviously involved in getting it to their users, so they’re automating that. So that’s not software as a service, but that’s a way that you could use software in your company and make it more efficient and save your company time.

[JOE]:
Yeah, that kind of opens a whole new door of ideas for me, like, even just thinking about an executive assistant. Just the other day, for example, we had opened… so I have several sub bank accounts, sub checking accounts, to kind of keep conference money organized, to keep payroll organized. So I have five or six checking accounts, and there’s a newer one and because of how much we have in there, we’re not supposed to have any of the fees for a business thing. So I noticed that there was, I think, a $2 fee that went through. Usually, I’m not that detail oriented, but I saw this $2 fee that wasn’t supposed to be there, thought oh, I need to call Laura over at the bank and have her waive that fee. Well, she calls me like before I even put her on my to do list for the day and I said, oh my gosh, like, you’re on my to do list to call, what’s up? She said, is it about the fee? And I said, yeah. And I said to her, well, you are the best banker I’ve ever had to be that proactive on like the day this fee happened. She said, well actually, the bank has this great system where I get a checklist each day of any things that are outstanding that my customers might have as a problem. And so just thinking about that customer service, even though it was a $2 fee, and if I didn’t notice it for a year, you know, we’re only talking 24 bucks a year, but it’s wasting money. It’s wasting my time to have to call her each month and say, why is this fee coming out? She then was proactive and it makes me want to do business with that bank, if I’m going to take a loan and know that I get that level of care for my business, of course, I’d want to work with them in the future. And so even just seeing that their internal system was so robust that she got an alert over a little $2 fee with one of her folks was just so cool that that technology helped her not have to keep track of all that in her head.

[GEORDIE]:
That’s right. That’s huge. As you say, it’s huge for gaining your trust and now making you want to come back, or maybe refer other people because you get that level of service. I mean, the banking world right now, in my opinion is terrible. They all… Wells Fargo banks and stuff, terrible customer service. So if they started doing things like that, it might slowly start to erode that bad opinion people have of banks right now.

[JOE]:
Yeah, well, and so even just thinking about someone that’s a front desk person that is maybe tracking intakes, tracking conversion of people – if you’re a private pay practice, how many people are converting? I think most people wouldn’t even know where to start. Where do you start if you want to bootstrap that, and at what point do you say, I really should hire somebody to build this for me?

[GEORDIE]:
So the way I look at it is if you can break down, let’s say, for example, like an EA – it’s a good example – if she’s doing repetitive tasks, you could really break that down into something like, so how many hours is she doing that? Let’s say it’s, you know, payroll, or something that she has to do and she’s doing, say, 10 hours a month, and then you say, well, how much am I paying her an hour? And then if there’s three other people that are involved, that are touching that same task, then you add that up over a year and you can see okay, well, this is actually adding up to some significant money, maybe it’s like $10,000 or $15,000. If I can automate that, and sometimes you can even do… there’s an app called Zapier, which connects Gmail and Google spreadsheets, and you can send things over to wherever is your CRM or something like that, or your practice, like, the one that your practice has that you mentioned, TherapyNotes – if you can kind of start connecting that, you can even do that very simply. We were talking, like, let’s get a consultant to come in and help with that, and it could be done very easily and end up saving her time, freeing her time up to do more valuable things like maybe call the customer and telling them about, like, that example that you used, and being proactive, and building that strong relationship with the customer.

[JOE]:
Oh, that’s so great. So when we start to think about software as a service, I’m thinking about how highly skilled so many of our listeners are. So they have masters and doctorate degrees in, say trauma, or in helping couples, and all sorts of psychological issues, and just living a better life. Where should they start if they’re thinking, I feel like there’s something here, you know, I’ve got 20 let’s say, couples, I have 20 couples on my caseload. I have a handful of things that I think if they had a software or an app that reminded them to do certain things that would really help the actual therapy sessions, but there’s probably a broader audience here. What would you say are some of the specific different ways that people can think through like, where to start with an app or a software that they may eventually want to sell?

[GEORDIE]:
So I would say if they’re noticing it over and over, the first thing to ask them is, you know, what are the core benefits that I’m trying to get out of it? So I’m trying to solve a solution and make my customers’ lives easier. A lot of people try and think about features but it’s… people tend to get bogged down in features and say oh, it needs to have a live chat or it needs to have this. When you’re going into software, you’re really trying to solve a core problem. So if it’s, for example, the customers are, you know, what’s an example of a problem that might be coming up for…?

[JOE]:
Yeah, I mean, I think that… so, say couples in general are getting bogged down by the everyday minutiae of life and not maybe making the relationship a priority.

[GEORDIE]:
Okay, so we could use something like a software like that. It could be like a tracking thing. Maybe he’s recommending something… maybe he’s… maybe they have a unique way of recommending the patients look at certain problems. And if they notice that, obviously, they’re specialists, they’ve seen hundreds of customers, if they notice that the same problems are coming up over and over again, then it looks like it says, well, hey, wait a second, why am I just serving these 20 clients when I could really be… I know this is a much bigger problem, I could be helping, on a smaller level, people how to solve this problem, let’s say it’s depression or something. And they have a unique way of looking about either to solve that problem like, say, repeat three mantras or something like that. And so they have their own way of looking at that problem. What they could do is they build a SaaS that could help other users come in, and so they would charge a lot less for that. So let’s say it’s $50 a month or something like that, and they use the software, and it helps them track this, and maybe it’s a mobile app or something, it sends a reminder. And then all of a sudden, they’ve got a much larger user pool for them to sort of draw off of. And so it’s a great way for them to get introduced to new users, because now their pool doesn’t need to be local to their area. So they’re a practice in Chicago or something, they can reach people in LA, or Texas…

[JOE]:
Assuming you’re licensed there.

[GEORDIE]:
Yeah. Okay. So that’s true. That’s a good point. But you can expand at least out of the Greater Chicago area, now you reach at least to the bigger parts of the state. And so you’ve got more people to draw in and eventually convert some of those people into customers. I mean, that’s just an example.

[JOE]:
Yeah. So what are maybe some questions in addition to what pains you’re seeing over and over that people should ask to start to brainstorm software as a service or adding these extra revenue streams?

[GEORDIE]:
So I think that the big one is even in your practice, you can start breaking down in your practice, what are the tasks that I’m doing repetitively every day, or someone in my staff is doing? How much is that actually costing? And break those down in hours. That’s why I have my app, so I can see like, how much that I’m doing in my day. So you can really put a monetary figure on that. And it’s surprisingly affordable for someone to build a minimum viable product, which is basically you just want a proof of concept. It doesn’t need to be polished; it just needs to solve one core problem. And your listeners would be in a position to know about a core problem that’s not being solved. So if they can build something for relatively inexpensive, and if they can even get in a position where they can verify that with their clients, is what do you think about this? We’re thinking about this, would this be of interest to you? And then they just start asking some of their clients for feedback, and they say, no, that’s not really a problem, then they can save theirself some money. But if some of them say yes, actually, that is a really… that sounds great, then you know you’re onto something.

I’ve even got to the point where I get pitched so many ideas from people, and looking at sort of different software as a service ideas, now what I’ll try and do is actually get people to pay me for that problem before I even build it. Because then I know the pain is so great, that it’s solving a significant problem, because it doesn’t exist. And it’s one thing for people to say, I’ll pay you when you build it, but it’s another one, they will actually pay you money before it even exists. I usually just put that in the form – how about if I build this for you, will you give me 12 months – so let’s say it’s $100 a month or something – you give me 12 months up front, and you can have 20% discount for life. And then you get five of those people and then you’ve just funded a new software as a service, minimal viable product. Granted, it’s not going to be like, full featured, but it’s going to solve that core problem. And if you get a clever enough software development company, they’ll be able to figure that out and be able to probably come in something close to that. I mean, depending… a lot of times people will get carried away and want more features, but that’s what I try and teach my clients is like, well, why do you really need that? This is not really solving your core problem. I think, why don’t we cut that, cut that, cut development time, you’ll be out in six weeks, and your users can get it in the hands and then have them tell you what you need.

[JOE]:
Yeah, I mean, you think about most apps and social media, they start with just one really basic concept. Instagram is for artists to post photos. Twitter, it was 140 characters. Tiktok, it’s short little videos, and you can swipe through them really fast. So even in social media, it’s usually there’s one thing that that specific app solves rather than trying to do too much within it. And I think the challenge for therapists is that we deal with human behavior all the time, and it feels so nuanced that to say, okay, I’m going to solve one problem, feels like well, but there’s a million problems, I want to solve them all within one app. And it’s like, that’s probably not the best way to think through it.

[GEORDIE]:
That’s right. It sounds to me like some type of reminder would be really good or, you know, something on a mobile phone that users could see if they’re dealing with… you know, maybe it’s things that the therapist has, maybe sending them, like, maybe it’s sort of little voice memo things, like he sends them a Thought for the Day or something like that. Whatever it is that can augment, and really improve the relationship between the doctor and patient. There’s ideas out there all the time and people have built great apps that are very niche specific and, you know, it’s a great business model because it’s recurring and it adds to the user base.

[JOE]:
Now, what about the ongoing marketing of software? I’m sure that in working with your clients that you’ve seen some that are successful, and maybe some that have a great idea but they don’t do the marketing very well. What have you noticed in the people that are successful in marketing a software as a service?

[GEORDIE]:
So it’s important with marketing really is… the two things that I would say about marketing, at least in software, and for the most part in any type of business is you need to be consistent, and you need to really focus in on one channel. And so what I see with the unsuccessful marketers in software as a service, they start saying, oh, well, I need to be on Facebook. And so they start with Facebook. Oh, that’s not working, so they switch, and we need to do Instagram, we need to do videos. What I recommend, and what I’m doing myself, is I’m consistent and so I pick a channel. So let’s say it’s content strategy for me. And so I say, every Monday we’re doing a blog post, and we focus in on one sort of keyword and we write five articles on that one keyword. So we really sort of own that small section of the search market. And we do that every single Monday.

[JOE]:
And real quick, how do you find that keyword? Like, what kind of research are you doing on that keyword to know that it’s worth your time to do those five articles?

[GEORDIE]:
Well, there’s tools out there, the one I use called Ahrefs. And so, for example, I would… let’s… here’s an example of a keyword that I was looking at yesterday. The keyword phrase is ‘MVP meaning’, and there’s 12,000 on that… actually, well, luckily, none of my competitors are going to be probably listening to this show so I [unclear] but the competition is low for that keyword. So I know from that, now if I write four articles around that, Google is going to reward me for that. So that’s a strategy right there. And it’s not the only strategy you have to use. But the key is I’m going after content, and I’m going to be consistent. So another one that I like is email, I write people that I think could be needing my service. So I do some research on that, and I have other people that do that research. And then I write them and say, hey, listen, I saw that you were using Salesforce – do you ever get frustrated with the reports not working or integrating into your marketing stack? I can help you with that. Something like that. And so the key is then, again, I do content marketing, and I do email, and I send 20 emails out every day – Saturday, Sunday, doesn’t matter. So it’s like this trickle effect that just helps to build. And you get results from that. And now if I was bouncing around from strategy to strategy, you know, I would be much less successful, and I wouldn’t even know where my leads were coming from.

[JOE]:
20 emails a day. I mean, I think about my consulting clients that often are pitching themselves to be on a podcast, they might be growing their practice, and they say, I sent 10 emails this week, and only one person responded, I feel like I’m a failure. What happens when you send 140 emails a week? I mean, that is over 500 emails a month that you’re sending – for your emotional side, of getting over being rejected, what happens when you send that many emails out?

[GEORDIE]:
Oh, first of all, rejection is nothing, right? You’re so used to rejection it’s just like it’s nothing. And you respect people. It’s not spam, because I’m looking at people and I’m finding and I’m just asking them a question. So it’s just like me saying, hey, you know, if I was writing a car dealer and like, do you have any cars in red? It’s the same sort of thing; it’s just a question. So rejection is no longer an issue, you respect people – unsubscribe, and they’re gone. But the thing is, the reason I send 20 is because if I was sending 100 a day, I couldn’t even keep up with the leads. So that tells you like, how effective it can be if you find something. And it doesn’t have to be emails, it could be live Instagrams or whatever. As long as you’re consistent, you start building your audience. And so I get people listening to the podcast that way, or people coming to the blog, and asking questions, and then I get them in the email list, which I know you’re very good at, and you just keep that relationship going. And if it’s email marketing through a list, then you’re just consistent. I’m sure you send out updates, whatever they are, once a week, and you give them really great content, and then your users are coming back. So I think it’s just consistency and picking one or two channels that you can really own.

[JOE]:
Well I imagine over time, if you know you’re doing over 100 emails a week, that you can then start to look at, okay, so here’s exactly what my stats are. So, out of those 500ish emails a month, I’m going to get 20 really quality conversations and out of those 20 conversations, I’m going to get 10 new customers, or whatever your stats are. So then, two months from now, you’re like, wow, my numbers are down. I need to get more clients. You then can say okay, I need to either send more emails, I need to increase my conversion rate, I need to increase the number of phone calls I’m having with people, and then you can actually determine where your business goes instead of just kind of throwing spaghetti at the wall.

[GEORDIE]:
That’s right. And so metrics is key in marketing as well. That’s actually the third pillar – I should have mentioned this – tracking all of it. So we have leads, we have emails going out, I have traffic on the website. So I’ve created a dashboard. Again, a software, nothing exists for all this stuff. So I’m piecing it together. I mean, this is another software as a service idea right now that we’re talking about. And you’re probably like me, tracking this and it’s just all over the place. I have some data in Google Analytics, I have some in my email soft autoresponder. And so I just put that into a spreadsheet, or my VA does. So if you’re tracking that, and the numbers are down because something happens, you either just need to send out more emails or you need to change the copy, create a different offer. So all of this tracking which offers work… And fortunately, you don’t have to do that. Most of the good email software companies do that. I use reply.io – they’re really good. They show me how many emails, who responded, they can track all that. So it’s good.

[JOE]:
Yeah. Well, Geordie, the last question I always ask is, if every private practitioner in the world were listening right now, what would you want them to know?

[GEORDIE]:
You know, I think it comes back to the, what are you doing? And what’s taking your time? Is that something that you can automate for one? And is there something that you’ve noticed over the years, dealing with your patients? Is there a problem that’s just consistently coming up, that you could spin into a software and serve a greater audience so that you could help more people. I mean, if you’re good at what you do, and you want to be able to help more people, then you expand your audience outside of the local drive distance to your practice, and you help more people by doing that. So software is the way to do that.

[JOE]:
Such great information and such new ideas for us to make more of an impact on the world. Geordie, if people want to work with you, if they want to hear more about what you’re doing, if they want to listen to your podcasts, where’s the best place to direct them?

[GEORDIE]:
So I have my website, is onestopdevshop.io. And obviously, you can reach me there. That’s what we do. We build Minimum Viable Products and we promise to be on time and on budget, or it’s on us. So you know, if I give you a quote, you know that we’ll stick to it. So otherwise, you know, I’m paying for it. And it doesn’t have to be with me, you can just look at what you can do with the small tools like Airtable and Zapier. If you’re not technical, you can find consultants and start automating things. It’s a great way to increase productivity and kind of get introduced to the software world and you can build off of that.

[JOE]:
Such great advice, Geordie. Thank you so much for being on the Practice of the Practice podcast.

[GEORDIE]:
Well, thank you so much for having me, Joe. It’s been a real pleasure.

[JOE]:
Well, thanks so much for listening to today’s episode. That idea of software as a service is something that I’m still kind of sorting through what that would look like. I would love to figure something out that’s a software that I would want to have made for me. So it’s fun to kind of dream about things and have people like Geordie that are willing to talk with me more about that. Also, don’t forget today, TherapyNotes is our sponsor. TherapyNotes is the best electronic health records; they are amazing. Use promo code JOE to get that three months free as well… actually two months free, I think it is. And if you’re a Next Level Practice member you are going to get six months for free, which is insane. They don’t offer that anywhere. All you have to do is sign up, forward your receipt to me, and then I will send that over there and they will credit you six months for free. Thanks so much for letting me into your ears and into your brain. Have an awesome day.

Special thanks to the band Silence is Sexy for your intro music; we really like it. This podcast is designed to provide accurate, authoritative information in regard to the subject matter covered. It is given with the understanding that neither the host, the publisher, or the guests are rendering legal, accounting, clinical or other professional information. If you want a professional, you should find one.

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