Dr. Andres Chou on Addressing Mental Health Needs Among Asian-Americans | FP 96

What are some things you should know as a clinician about the Asian-American community? How can you best support your Asian-American clients who are new to therapy?

In this podcast episode, Whitney Owens speaks with Dr. Andres Chou about addressing mental health needs among the Asian-American community.

Meet Dr. Andres Chou

Dr. Andres Chou is a clinical psychologist and private practice owner in Pasadena, CA, where he provides therapy and psychological assessment services. He is passionate about Asian-American mental health and working with people from a faith-based background. Outside of psychology, he prides himself in sharing dad jokes, much to the dismay of his poor wife and son.

Dr. Andres Chou is a clinical psychologist and private practice owner in Pasadena, CA, where he provides therapy and psychological assessment services. He is passionate about Asian-American mental health and working with people from a faith-based background. Outside of psychology, he prides himself in sharing dad jokes, much to the dismay of his poor wife and son.

Visit his website.

In This Podcast

  • How can therapists meet the needs of the Asian-American community?
  • The Asian-American community is not a monolith

How can therapists meet the needs of the Asian-American community?

I think what’s important to think about here is that a lot of the Asian-American community doesn’t know what to do with what’s going on. (Dr. Andres Chou)

It is important to recognize that for the Asian-American community, there is a tendency to keep quiet and avoid rocking the boat.

Some Asian-American communities and families will downplay the violence or strife in order to keep it under wraps and in doing so, rid themselves of the opportunity to express their anger or frustration.

The first thing as clinicians is to think about is that if you’re working with an Asian-American client is thinking about the fact that this person has their own unique and individual experience and there might be a tendency to minimize that experience as an Asian-American. Be mindful of that and give space for secondary conversations. (Dr. Andres Chou)

The Asian-American community is not a monolith

The Asian-American community in the United States is incredibly broad. There are many families and communities that came from different countries across Asia at different periods of time and for different reasons.

Therefore, it is important that you do not treat the Asian-American community as one entity. It is an umbrella term that collects and describes a wide range of experiences, cultures, and communities.

When you are working with an Asian-American client, it is important not to treat their experience like the experiences of others: get to know them and their unique circumstances without comparing them to other Asian-American people.

Be curious. I think that’s really important when it comes to working with the Asian-American community. Just be curious and try to understand, engage and be intentional, and I think that happens outside of our practices too. I am challenged … [to consider] what I am doing to engage with people [that are] not like me? (Dr. Andres Chou)

Be intentional and guide your Asian-American clients through their therapy, especially if they are new to therapy, or have not before had such an open space to discuss themselves and what they feel.

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Meet Whitney Owens

Photo of Christian therapist Whitney Owens. Whitney helps other christian counselors grow faith based private practices!Whitney is a licensed professional counselor and owns a growing group practice in Savannah, Georgia. Along with a wealth of experience managing a practice, she also has an extensive history working in a variety of clinical and religious settings, allowing her to specialize in consulting for faith-based practices and those wanting to connect with religious organizations.

Knowing the pains and difficulties surrounding building a private practice, she started this podcast to help clinicians start, grow, and scale a faith-based practice. She has learned how to start and grow a successful practice that adheres to her own faith and values. And as a private practice consultant, she has helped many clinicians do the same.

Thanks For Listening!

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Faith in Practice is part of the Practice of the Practice Podcast Network, a network of podcasts that are changing the world. To hear other podcasts like Empowered and Unapologetic, Bomb Mom, Imperfect Thriving, Marketing a Practice or Beta Male Revolution, go to practiceofthepractice.com/network.

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