How Rachel Moheban-Wachtel Built a Self-Pay Couples Counseling Private Practice | GP 97

Image of Rachel Moheban-Wachtel. On this therapist podcast, Rachel Moheban-Wachtel talks about how she built a Self-Pay Couples Counseling Private Practice

What are the tenets of marketing a successful self-pay practice in a competitive city? How do you get newly hired hire clinicians up to speed with your standards? Why is it important to follow the trends?

In this podcast episode, Alison Pidgeon speaks with Rachel Moheban-Wachtel about How She Built a Self-Pay Couples Counseling Private Practice.

Meet Rachel Moheban-Wachtel

A photo of Rachel Moheban-Wachtel is captured. Rachel is a licensed clinical social worker and the owner of The Relationship Suite. She is featured on Grow a Group Practice, a therapist podcast.

Rachel has been a psychotherapist for over two decades in New York City and New Jersey. She has a group practice, The Relationship Suite, where they specialize in relationship issues and couples/marriage counseling.

She has extensive training and certifications in various couple’s therapy modalities including; Imago Relationship Therapy, Emotionally Focused Therapy, Mediation, and EMDR. She also created a self-study audio program for couples, “The Online Couples Toolkit“, which is a step-by-step program on how to create more intimacy and rekindle romance in your relationship.

Visit The Relationship Suite website. Connect with them on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, and LinkedIn.

FREEBIE: Listeners can go to relationshipsuite.com/intimacy and receive two e-books “Tame Your Temper and Regain your Connection to Your Partner” and “Create More Intimacy in Your Relationship.”

In This Podcast

  • Marketing a self-pay practice in New York City
  • Hiring clinicians and training
  • Rachel’s advice to clinicians working with couples

Marketing a self-pay practice in New York City

Have a strong network:

Connect with people in your profession who do not see the same clients that you see and build a referral system.

You’re always networking. You’re networking with mediators and other clinicians that don’t want to do couples … one of the things that we do is [finding] how we stand out amongst all this competition. (Rachel Moheban-Wachtel)

Have your niche:

Standing out is important because you will become known as the expert in your field as you stick to it.

Constantly work and update the website:

A great way to garner good marketing is to work with and speak to the client’s needs on your website to encourage them to work with you.

SEO optimization:

Make sure that your SEO is optimized to ensure that your website to able to reach your clients and is easy to find.

Hiring clinicians and training

It is important to provide quality service to the clients that come to your practice. For Rachel’s practice, their clients appreciate seasoned clinicians with training and life experience to interact within therapy.

The training comes along with a lot of supervision from me because a couple’s modality is so different from working with individuals, so you can be the best individual counselor be thrown in a room with a couple and not know how to navigate. (Rachel Moheban-Wachtel)

Rachel and her staff have a hands-on approach to training to ensure that the new therapist is well-equipped to guide and interact with their clients to fit the standards of the practice.

Rachel’s advice to clinicians working with couples

  • Survey your area: do clients in your city and state pay more insurance or cash?

It is important to key into this to make it easier for your clients to pay you and have access to your services.

  • Focus on abundance: there are enough clients for everyone, so do not be afraid to niche down. Establish yourself in your field and build a strong referral base.
  • Go with the trends in your way: due to the pandemic, many people are wanting to complete their therapy from home. Offer virtual services. Follow the trends but shape them in the ways that best suit your practice and your clinicians.
  • Be trained in specifically working with couples: being fully trained and comfortable in working with couples will help you to provide the best therapy you can.

Books mentioned in this episode:

Useful links mentioned in this episode:

Check out these additional resources:

Meet Alison Pidgeon, Group Practice Owner

An image of Alison Pidgeon is displayed. She is a successful group practice owner and offers private practice consultation for private practice owners to assist in how to grow a group practice. She is the host of Grow A Group Practice Podcast and one of the founders of Group Practice Boss.Alison Pidgeon, LPC is the owner of Move Forward Counseling, a group practice in Lancaster, PA and she runs a virtual assistant company, Move Forward Virtual Assistants.

Alison has been working with Practice of the Practice since 2016.  She has helped over 70 therapist entrepreneurs start and grow their businesses, through mastermind groups and individual consulting.

Transformation From A Private Practice To Group Practice

In addition, she is a private practice consultant for Practice of the Practice. Allison’s private practice ‘grew up.’ What started out as a solo private practice in early 2015 quickly grew into a group practice and has been expanding ever since.

Visit Alison’s website, listen to her podcast, or consult with Alison. Email Alison at alison@practiceofthepractice.com

Thanks For Listening!

Feel free to leave a comment below or share this podcast on social media by clicking on one of the social media links below! Alternatively, leave a review on iTunes and subscribe!

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