Travis Chappell on How to Meet Your Hero | PoP 478

Travis Chappell on How to Meet Your Hero | PoP 478

How can you position yourself to build authentic relationships with the people you want to know? Where can you find these people? What can thinking differently do to help you level up your game?

In this podcast episode, Joe Sanok speaks to Travis Chappell about how to meet your heroes and creating authentic relationships.

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Meet Travis Chappell

Travis Chappell is a podcast consultant and professional connector. He is the founder of Gorilla Podcasts, a full-stack podcast production company specializing in helping busy entrepreneurs produce profitable podcasts, and he is the host of two top shows, Build Your Network and World Class.

In addition to being featured in Entrepreneur, NASDAQ, Yahoo Finance, and ReadWrite, Travis has also been featured in Forbes as a top ten podcast that will change your life alongside of Joe Rogan, Gary Vaynerchuck, Tim Ferriss, and the like.

Visit Travis’ website, connect on Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook.

Listen to the podcast here.

In This Podcast

Summary

  • What is a professional connector?
  • How to meet people in an authentic way
  • Leveling up by thinking differently
  • How to find the types of events you’ll find seven-figure people at
  • Authentic relationships rather than fanboy type relationships

What is a professional connector?

A professional connector is somebody who goes out of their way to connect people to other people. Travis really tries to bring value to a lot of his relationships by thinking of who in his network would like to know each other and then he makes that connection and sometimes it turns into actual dollars and cents. If a connection turns into revenue for multiple parties that Travis has connected then he will sometimes get a piece of that like a commission. Sometimes it has been negotiated upfront but other times it’s just a courtesy thank you for the introduction.

How to meet people in an authentic way

It’s important to have an ask… Have a meaningful request. Have a real reason to reach out to someone that you want to connect with, that has nothing to do with you selling them something. This allows you to build a genuine relationship and connection with someone right off the bat instead of making them feel like you’re just spamming their inbox. This is one reason why Travis is so huge on podcasting – it gives you such a great excuse to reach out to people who normally wouldn’t give you the time of day.

Leveling up by thinking differently

You can’t get caught in the minutiae of six-figure networking if you want to be on a seven-figure level. Think in the mind of the person that you want to be, not in the mind of the person you are.

When Travis was starting his podcast, he was doing all of the things that traditionally we’re taught to do but realized that when he was going to these networking events, it was always just the struggling people that were there and not the influential people that he really wanted to connect with. Travis had to figure out what those people were doing and where they were connecting with each other. That’s when he started going to higher-level events, started reaching out to people to get them onto his podcast, and that’s when his activities around relationship building and networking changed completely from the inside out.

Travis started looking at things from a “What can I add” standpoint instead of a “What can I get” standpoint asking what he could give these people, how could he convince them that he is worth them spending time on him so that he could learn more from them, and how could he get to know them on a level that most people don’t. He learned these things by following success as success leaves clues. You have to find what those successful people are doing and then mirror these things.

How to find the types of events you’ll find seven-figure people at

  • Start researching the people that are crushing it in whatever space you’re in.
  • Google their names plus the words ‘event’ or ‘conference’.
  • Make a list of these events that you know those people are going to be at.

You’ll find that a good chunk of these people probably go to the same events and probably hang out in the same circles so if you can get to know 3 or 4 of them then you can get to know 10 or 12 of them.

Authentic relationships rather than fanboy type relationships

And that’s a huge part of it that a lot of people miss out on is that some people will pay people money, but then they never take action on any of the stuff that person tells them to do. They never see any results. And people that have a lot of demands on their time, don’t like spending time with people, or offering advice to people that aren’t going to take it seriously and actually implement it and see real change and results in their life.

A lot of the time, the person that you want to connect with is the same person that everyone else wants to connect with. How can you get authentic relationships out of these events rather than a fanboy type of relationship?

Travis had the experience early on where he ruined his first connection with people because he didn’t know what he was doing or what to say. There definitely needs to be some strategy there and the best thing for Travis was connecting with people prior to an event so that he has a real talking point when he walks up to them at an event:

  • Send a thank you card/postcard/small gift to say
    – Thank you for the work you do
    – I really enjoyed this book that you wrote
    – I look up to the way that you’ve built your business
  • This gives you a connection point beforehand so that when you’re at the event you’re not just throwing an elevator pitch at them but actually referencing the contact made prior to the event.
  • This gives you a talking point straight off the bat and automatically makes them think of you as a higher level rather than someone who just comes up to them asking for a selfie.

Focus on a couple of the most well-connected people in your particular industry and get to know them in a different setting. Everyone speaks the language of money so offer to pay them for some advice sometime or to get a little bit of a mentorship session. If they don’t typically do that, offer them $500 for a half-hour of their time for example. Do something that allows you to connect with them in a different way.

Enroll in the Meet Your Hero Course for free!

Books by Travis Chappell

Useful Links:

Meet Joe Sanok

private practice consultant

Joe Sanok helps counselors to create thriving practices that are the envy of other counselors. He has helped counselors to grow their businesses by 50-500% and is proud of all the private practice owners that are growing their income, influence, and impact on the world. Click here to explore consulting with Joe.

Thanks For Listening!

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Podcast Transcription

[JOE]:
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This is the Practice of the Practice podcast with Joe Sanok, session number 478.

I want to tell you a secret. When I was a kid, my hero was Bon Jovi. I loved every song that he played. I still remember the Young Guns 2 soundtrack, Blaze of Glory, and just that video. He was totally my hero. I loved Bon Jovi. I still love Bon Jovi. I was in a hardcore band, a screamo band in college, and we played Living on a Prayer and did it in like a screamo, and I was the backup screamer in that band, and he was my hero. Today, Travis Chappell is going to be talking about how to meet your hero, and he talks through some unbelievable ways of getting into circles that in many ways, I have no business being in. And Travis gives such cool techniques and ways to think through meeting your hero and leveling up, both paid and free. It’s so awesome to just hear his tips. I get to talk with him a little bit over at Podfest earlier this year before quarantine started, and so I’m so glad that he came on to share these tips. So, without any further ado, here’s Travis.

Well today on the Practice of the Practice podcast, we have Travis Chappell. Travis is a podcast consultant and professional connector. He’s the founder of World Class Media, a full stack podcast production company that specializes in helping busy entrepreneurs produce world class podcasts. In addition to being featured in Entrepreneur, Naztech, and ReadWrite, Travis has also been featured in Forbes as a top 10 podcast that will change your life alongside Joe Rogan, Gary Vaynerchuk, Tim Ferriss, and six other awesome podcasters. He’s the creator and host of both World Class, a podcast that reverse engineers what it takes to be world class at what you do, and Build Your Network, a top 25 business podcast dedicated to helping entrepreneurs cultivate genuine relationships the right way. I’ve got that right almost to the end there, Travis. Welcome to the Practice of the Practice podcast. How’re you doing?

[TRAVIS]:
Doing really well, Joe. How about you?

[JOE]:
I’m doing well. You know, we met at Podfest which now, as we’re in quarantine, feels like a lifetime ago. But you are a professional connector. For you, what does professional connector mean?

[TRAVIS]:
Yeah, I think a professional connector is somebody who goes out of their way to try to connect people to other people. And that’s one thing that I really tried to do to bring value to a lot of the relationships that I have is to be a connector of people. And to think about it in a way of like, if I were this person, who do I know in my network that I would like to know if I were this person? And then I make that connection. And I say professional because sometimes it turns into actual dollars and cents, which I think is the actual definition of professional – if you get paid to do something.

[JOE]:
And so, are there people that then specifically pay you to connect people? Or it’s just, if someone makes a great connection, they just give you some money or like, how does that actually play out?

[TRAVIS]:
Yeah, if a connection turns into revenue for multiple parties that I’ve connected, then sometimes I get a piece of that. And sometimes it’s been talked about and negotiated upfront, but other times it’s just kind of like a courtesy, like, hey, man, thanks for making that introduction, you know what I mean, we ended up doing X amount of dollars in business together. Here’s a little bit of a commission on that.

[JOE]:
Yeah. Well, I think a lot of the listeners, they’ve built networks maybe locally for their counseling practices, and they’re ready to level up. They’re starting a podcast, eCourses, membership communities, and they look at the world of Instagram, or wherever there’s influencers and they say, I have no idea how to connect with these people. They’ve got fifty thousand, a hundred thousand, a million followers, and I’m just getting going; where do I even start? So for people that are kind of at that front end, that they’re saying, I want to grow and I want to meet people that are farther along than myself, what are some ways that you can do that in a way that’s not slimy? Because I know that if I was at that level, I wouldn’t want to have people just saying, hey, I want to meet you so I can use you to make more money for myself. How do you do that in an authentic way?

[TRAVIS]:
Yeah, I think that it’s important to have an ‘ask’. So, I have a free course on this called Meet Your Hero; it’s based on my book, Meet Your Hero. But it’s a totally free course, you can check it on meetyourherocourse.com, but it kind of goes into this way more in depth and in detail. But one thing I talk about in there is having a meaningful request, having a real reason to reach out to these people that you want to connect with that’s not anything about you selling them something. It’s much easier to connect with somebody with a different type of an ask, that doesn’t lead to like dollars and cents in your bank account, that allows you to build a genuine relationship and connection with somebody right off the bat instead of make them feel like you’re just spamming their inbox. And so that’s one reason why I’m so huge on podcasting, man, because it’s such a great excuse to reach out to whoever you want to reach out to. People that normally wouldn’t give you the time of day, if you have a podcast, they’re going to be like, sure, I’ll be a guest on your podcast. And literally I had people tell that to me when I first started, man.

So to give you an example, there was a… this happened on a couple of different occasions and then from then on, I just stopped asking for this smaller ask, so I went to reach out to this one guy, and I asked him for, like, three or four minute phone call or something like that, where it was like, hey, man – I wanted to start out with a really small ask instead of asking him to come on my podcast right away cuz I figured that was a bigger ask. So, I said, you know, I would love to get just three or four minutes on a phone call sometime. I’ve just got a quick question for you. And he said, no, because he ran a mastermind group that had people in there that paid him $30,000 a year in order to be able to have cell phone access to him, so he was like, it wouldn’t be fair to them if I let you do that for free when they’re paying that much money, and I was like, hey, totally understandable. I totally get that. But because I’m a persistent person, I mentioned that I had a podcast in the reply that I sent back. And then without hesitation, he sent back an email that was like, okay, well, I’ll come on your podcast then. I was like, wait a second, so, you’re gonna say no to a three-minute phone call with just me and you that nobody knows about, where I ask you like one question. But you’re going to say yes to a 45 minute podcast interview, where I can ask you whatever question I want to ask you, and I can take that and publish it and share it with the world, and piggyback on some of your credibility and branding? Like, that, to me, was an eye-opening experience, and that didn’t just happen that one time, it happened again. And then after the second time, I stopped asking people for three-minute phone calls anymore because I realized that that was more of an ask that didn’t have any benefit for that person. Whereas a podcast interview does have benefit for that person.

So yeah, it was a crazy, eye opening experience to me with that podcasting thing. But if you’re somebody out there that doesn’t want to start a podcast, you have no desire to do that because of whatever reason, I would really challenge you to think about it just for this one reason, even if you never get a single download, even if you never make a dime from your show, you know, which are usually the metrics that people look forward to determine what a successful show is, think about the connections that you can make and the people that you can connect with that normally wouldn’t give you the time of day because you have this new form of media called podcasting at your disposal. Like just the network building in and of itself, I think, is totally worth starting a show.

[JOE]:
Oh, yeah. 100%. And I think that’s one of the things that people don’t even think of, is the network of people that they make as a result of their podcasts. All these other people doing really interesting work. And people that oftentimes then you can follow up with and say, hey, I’m stuck in this area. Can I have just a quick piece of advice, they’re more likely if they’ve been on your show, and you have that connection with them to give you some of that free advice.

[TRAVIS]:
Totally. Totally hundred percent because you’ve started that relationship already. You’re not a stranger anymore. A perfect example, man, like, if instead of reaching out to me to ask me to be on your show, you just asked me for like a free phone call, I’d be like, I can’t do that. I have people that pay me for that stuff. It’s not fair to them to do it for free for other people, when they’re just asking for it, you know, like, I don’t have enough time in the day to say yes to all of those requests. But if you can get me on a podcast interview, then I send you a booking link, and you book me on your show, and then we get to have a conversation for a longer period of time, and really actually get to know each other a little bit.

[JOE]:
Yeah, that’s so awesome. Well, I’m gonna, I’m gonna take your advice and ask some consulting advice for myself. And if the listeners get something out of it awesome, and if not, well, too bad. So, I just got a contract with HarperCollins Leadership to write a book. I’m working on the book right now.

[TRAVIS]:
Amazing.

[JOE]:
So in about a year or so, we’re going to be launching that. So, as I look over the next year, this is going to be a general business book. The working title is Thursday is the new Friday. For a long time, I’ve been doing a three-day workweek, or we’re talking four-day workweek, slowing down to speed up, that sort of thing. So if I were your consulting client, and you said, okay, Joe, you’ve got less than a year before the launch of this book, how do I position myself to meet other people that will not only help with the book, but that I can add value to their community as well?

[TRAVIS]:
Yeah, exactly what we’re doing right now, man, you’re doing it already. Like, we met at a podcasting conference, where there’s a bunch of podcasters, like, you are meeting with distribution, which is what you need for your book, right? That’s all a publisher really cares about, is distribution. You know what I mean? Obviously, the content is pretty important. But I can guarantee this, if you have somebody that that has a book idea that is worse content than your book, but they have a distribution channel, they’re going to get a better book deal, because all they care about is dollars and cents and making money, not getting your best message out into the world, or whatever. So, you need distribution. So good on you for going to a podcasting event to meet with other podcasters who have distribution channels in order to get the message out around your show. And that’s exactly what I would be doing for the next year, if I were you, is just connecting with as many people that have audiences as possible and adding as much value to those people as you can. Just going in and building relationships and adding value to people that, at the end of the day… and by the way, you have to be okay with people not returning the favor as well. You can’t go in and do favors for people and then call in a favor, but they never agreed to do a favor for you. And then you have this weird, like, unspoken social contract that neither one of you signed, and then you start getting upset with people. You have to be willing to add value to people without the expectation of receiving anything in return. And just know that the universe is going to return that back to you at some point. And that’s 100% what I would be doing if I were in your shoes right now.

[JOE]:
I remember when I first started my private practice, and I just got an email actually that really represents that feeling of how many questions you have. This person emailed me and said, you know, now with COVID, how do I do all this online? Do I have to change my address? How do I do new marketing in my city? Do I keep my local address? Do I close my office? Do I have a virtual address? How do I jump into telehealth 100%? And how do I even market that? You know, these are the kind of things that we cover all the time in Next Level Practice. Next Level Practice is a membership community of over 400 clinicians starting and growing their private practices. So, if you are wanting to grow, I want you to sign up this August when we open up Next Level Practice again. On August 24th, we open it back up and I want you to join it. Head on over to practiceofthepractice.com/invite and you will get all the details about this amazing community, specifically for people starting and growing a private practice. Again, that’s practiceofthepractice.com/invite.

[JOE]:
So besides going on other people’s podcasts, building into their community, what are other ways that you would say people can continue to level up their game, not just through meeting other people, but just even by thinking differently? How do these top performers really think to be able to kind of build their networks?

[TRAVIS]:
Yeah, you have to think… you can’t get caught in the minutiae of six figure networking if you want to be on a seven-figure level. You always have to be thinking in the mind of the person that you want to be, not in the mind of the person that you are. Does that make sense? So if you’re a real estate agent, and you’re hovering around $80,000 a year, and you want to get to a quarter million dollars a year, then you have to think like somebody who is making a quarter million dollars a year which means your activities have to be different. The way that you connect to people is probably different. The way that you network people is probably different. And that’s what I realized when I was starting my podcast was that I was doing all the things that I was taught to do traditionally, from a networking standpoint, right? Like, go to the networking event, or write on your name tag, and have 500 business cards in your back pocket, and go connect with people, and try to book business. You know what I mean, like, follow up, and if you don’t leave with a list of a bunch of names, and you don’t follow up the next day, and you don’t book business by Friday, then it was not a successful networking event. But what I started realizing was, when I would go to events like that, the people that I really wanted to connect with, like the influential people that were seven figure plus business owners, they were never at those events. It was always all of the struggling people that were all making fifty grand a year in their insurance agency and trying to get to seventy grand a year. You know what I mean? And so I realized really quickly that the people that I really wanted to be like, the people that I really wanted to, like, duplicate their success, they weren’t doing any of the things that everybody teaches all the time. So, I had to go figure out what those people were doing and where they were connecting with each other. And so that’s when I started going to bigger events and going to bigger conferences and, and connecting with people on a higher level because I wanted to do the activities of the people whose success I wanted to duplicate, not the activities of the people who were in the rat race like I was, if that makes sense.

So, at that point, I’d figured out that none of these people were doing any of the stuff that I was doing. And so, I had to go figure… I had to go learn from those people directly. And then that’s kind of what ended up happening. That’s why I started going to those higher-level events. That’s when I started really reaching out to people and getting them on my show and on my podcast, and that’s when my activities around relationship building, and networking, changed completely from the inside out and started looking at it way more from a value add standpoint, instead of a what can I get standpoint. What can I give to these people? And how can I convince them that I am worth them spending time with me so that I can learn more from these people and get to know them on a level that most people don’t ever really get to know these people on? So yeah, there’s so many things in there that that I learned in that process, just by following success, like, success leaves clues. And it’s a saying old as time, but it rings true; you have to find what those successful people are doing and then mirror the things that they’re doing.

[JOE]:
Now, so, it’s pretty easy to say okay, the networking events that everyone goes to, like, maybe that’s the people that aren’t at the level you want to play at. What’s the checklist of the types of events that more seven figure people are at? Are they the more individualized events? Are they… like, I wouldn’t even know where to start in that area. So yeah, where do you start?

[TRAVIS]:
Just start researching the people that are crushing it in whatever space that you’re in. There’s always, like, whatever industry you’re in, there’s people that are doing it at the highest level, and they’re always in the top 1%, or the top 0.5% of people that are in that industry, regardless of the industry. So, you probably already know some of those people’s names. If you don’t, then really take some time to research, like, who are the bestselling authors in the space? Who are the people running the best shows and, you know, who are the influential people that are in this industry? And then just google them. And Google this person’s name, plus the word ‘event’ or ‘conference’, or something like that, and make a list of events and conferences that you know those people are going to be at. That was what changed for me, is that I made a real list of real people that I really wanted to connect with. So, it’s not an abstract idea of like, I want to connect with top podcasters. It was like, here’s 25 names of people in this industry that I want to connect with. And then you Google those names and you’ve come to find out that there’s probably two or three bigger industry type events that all of those people go to, or at least a good chunk of those people go to, and they probably hang out in the same circles, which means that if you can get to know three or four of them, then you can get to know 10 or 12 of them because they all kind of run in the same circles and know each other anyway. Because they’re all in the same industry, and they’re all the top people in those industries. So, they’re probably all sharing stages, they’re probably all doing podcast interview swaps, they’re probably all writing forewords, or endorsements for each other’s books, whatever the case may be. Write a real list of actual names, Google those names with the word event or conference or whatever. And then, you know, make a list of four to six events that you can go to this year. Obviously, right now is a little bit different with all the stuff going on in the world, but eventually, we’ll be back into the way that things were before, and you’ll be able to do those things.

[JOE]:
I know for myself, I always kind of worry about coming across as a bit of a stalker where you’re at this event, and you know, there’s 2000 people and there’s the three or four people you want to connect with. And a lot of times that’s who a lot of the people want to connect with. What are some ways to just make sure that… because the way I have relationships with my friends is, we have good relationships, we’re authentic, we have deep conversations. I don’t usually target people I want to be friends with, it just kind of happens. And I’m not saying that that’s what you’re saying at all. I mean, I think you’re saying, like, set a goal and kind of go for it. How do we then, when you’re at those events, for you, how did that turn into authentic relationships rather than just like a fanboy type of relationship? Does that make sense?

[TRAVIS]:
Yeah, definitely. And I definitely had that experience early on, where I just kind of like went up to people and I didn’t know what I was doing. I didn’t know what to say. And I just, like, ruined my first connection with them. So, I do think that there definitely needs to be some strategy there. The best thing for me that I’ve found is connecting with people prior to an event that I’m going to, so that I have a real talking point when I walk up to that event, if there’s somebody that I want to really, you know, interact or engage with, so I might send them a thank you card or a postcard or a small gift to say thank you for the work that you do, and I really enjoyed this book that you wrote or this thing that you put out, or I look up to the way that you’ve built your business, or something like that where you are making a connection point beforehand, so that when you’re at the event, you’re not just barfing up some Top of Mind elevator pitch on them. But you’re actually saying something like, hey, so and so, my name is Travis, we were having a conversation on Instagram the other day, or on the email the other day, or I sent you a postcard in the mail last week, or I sent you this small gift, did you get that? I just want to make sure that you got that. It gives you a talking point right off the bat and automatically makes them think of you as a higher level than somebody who just comes up to them and says, hey, can I get a selfie? So, coming in with a little bit of strategy definitely helps.

But really, the big thing would be to focus on a couple of the most well-connected people in those industries, and get to know them in a different setting, like, offer to pay them for some advice some time. You know, everybody speaks the language of money. So if you can get a little bit of mentorship from somebody and just say like, hey man, I don’t know how much you charge for mentorship session and if they don’t like typically do those things just say, like, offer something, offer 500 bucks for a half hour of their time, something that allows you to connect to them a little bit different. And that’s really what I did to get to know all the top podcasters in the space was through a mentor of mine, John Lee Dumas. And he is somebody that’s really well connected in the podcasting space. He knows everybody. And he’s been doing this for a long time and he’s a multi, multi-million-dollar earner in the podcasting space and was somebody that I wanted to really learn from. So instead of trying to be like the 5000 other people that reached out to him last year, I wanted to be a little bit different. So, I ended up paying to be a part of a three-day mastermind that he was hosting at his house, it was 6500 bucks. And I went out to his house for three days, got to know him and his girl a little bit better. His girlfriend, Kate, who’s also really awesome. And then from there, we were able to build a better relationship. I volunteered to help them with a couple projects that they were working on, totally for free. And they ended up accepting that proposal to work for them for free and got to know them really well through that process. So, then it made connecting with people at some of these other events and conferences much easier, because I had a warm introduction from somebody who’s really well known in the space. And so then, when I was able to make those initial connections with those first two or three people that I got warm introductions from, then I was able to hang out with them. So, like, literally from like, an event, I want to say it was… actually, I think it was Podfest last year, 2019 Podfest where… I don’t know, were you at that one, Joe?

[JOE]:
No, this was my first one. I had been asked to do one of the breakout sessions and so yeah, Joe and Matt, who have the Hustle and Flow Chart podcast…

[TRAVIS]:
Gotcha.

[JOE]:
They introduced me and then another guy, he introduced me to Chris, and so, yeah, very similar kind of story to what you’re talking about, where people that I already knew that were podcasters helped get me in the door.

[TRAVIS]:
Yeah, sure, sure, sure. So, what ended up happening last year is the keynote speakers were John Lee Dumas, Michael O’Neal, Pat Flynn, Jordan Harbinger, and a few others. And I had hung out with all of them on separate occasions through John, a couple of them in Australia at a podcasting conference out there, a couple of them in San Diego, and then in Vegas. And so, at that point, I had built relationships with all of the top keynote speakers that were at that event. And so, I found myself in a dinner room that night with JLD, his family, Jordan Harbinger was there, Pat Flynn was there, Michael O’Neal was there, one other keynote speaker was there, and then me. And all these other people have been in this industry for, some of them, over a decade. I’ve been in it for, at the time, less than two years. And here I am sitting at a dinner table in a private room of a restaurant in Orlando with all the top speakers just simply because I built a relationship that started with one guy who… I made the most of that relationship, and I wasn’t just somebody who paid him money, like, I paid him money, but I also took action on his advice. And that’s a huge part of it that a lot of people miss out on, is that some people will pay people money, but then they never take action on any of the stuff that person tells them to do. They never see any results. And people that have a lot of demands on their time, don’t like spending time with people, or offering advice to people that aren’t going to take it seriously and actually implement it and see real change and results in their life. So, at the same time of building that relationship, I was also implementing a lot of the things that I learned from him, which then makes him feel better about introducing me to people in his network, because he knows that I’m somebody that isn’t going to waste people’s time. He knows that I’m somebody that’s not going to make him look bad if he makes an introduction for me, and he knows that I’m going to be a valuable asset to that person as well, just like I’ve been for him. So, for me, it was very strategic, but it helped me to be able to build those relationships in a much more organic way.

[JOE]:
No, I think that’s awesome. And as I think about the people I’ve connected with, whether it’s people that I’ve met through conferences I’ve put on, or people that have done consulting with me – not that it means that just because you gave money, I’m gonna hang out with you – but there is a level of investment in someone’s work when you say, I trust you to pay $6500 to come to your house, to do a deep dive, to do the action. And when you really think about what doors that opened for you, to hang out with John Lee Dumas and then to be able to get into a new space, like, that $6500, I’m sure was totally multiplied.

[TRAVIS]:
Oh, yeah. I mean, basically my entire business started there. That means, like, everything that I make, everything I do really started with that initial investment. And not to say… and I think people sometimes get this confused because I’m not here saying that I would not have been able to figure it out by myself. But what I am saying is that I think it would have taken me many years to catch up to the point where I am right now had I tried to do it by myself and not gone through those mentors and those relationships, those connections with the people who were crushing it in the space I wanted to be successful in.

[JOE]:
Yeah, no, I think that’s a good distinction. I do think that when you surround yourself with the right people, it speeds things up. And so, whatever it takes to do that in a way that’s authentic to you. Now, when you think about your future plans, so, you get to a certain point, and there could be a tendency to plateau. How do you do your own goal setting now? I mean, you’ve got a great network of people, how do you kind of look at the next year or so in regards to your own development and growth?

[TRAVIS]:
In terms of like, my business, or my show, or…?

[JOE]:
Yeah, yeah. So, networking got you kind of to where you’re at, and then when you kind of look to the future, what’s going to help continue to grow your business for you? Oh, yeah, I mean, same thing. To me, if it’s not broke, don’t fix it. So, for me, my network’s gotten me to this point, I continually invest in my network. So, the first mastermind I ever did was with John Lee Dumas at his house in Puerto Rico, it was $6500. The most recent mastermind that I joined cost me $100,000. But it also put me into a network of a bunch more really, really high level individuals, like, seven figure people all over the place, eight figure people all over the place, and even like 25-30 nine figure people, and a few 10 figure people that are in that group. So, it’s gotten me to this point. So that’s the thing that I’m focusing on to continue to get me to the next point. And I think that if you can just connect to the people that have already done it, then you can learn from them. You don’t have to reinvent the wheel, you just have to duplicate the process that they went through by getting to know what that process was, through the people that actually have been there and done that.

[JOE]:
Such great advice. Travis, the last question I always ask is, if every private practitioner in the world were listening right now, what would you want them to know?

[TRAVIS]:
Ah, that’s a good question. I would say the biggest thing that I would want them to know is that opportunity comes from your relationships. And I think that people who have more education, a higher educated crowd, tend to rely on their own laurels more often than not, and to be fair, like, a lot of times, it makes sense to me because you’ve put that much work into your education, you’ve put that much work into becoming somebody that’s really knowledgeable in your industry or craft. Like, that deserves an applause and you should be proud of that. But I can say this: the opportunity lies in the connections, not the knowledge, because the knowledge can be gotten by anybody that goes through the same track that you went through, whatever that track was. So if you really want to be, like, the biggest earner, if you want to have the most success, if that’s on your radar, if that’s your goal, which if you’re listening to this show, it probably is something… like, if that is not your specific goal, it’s got to be something similar to that or you wouldn’t be listening to a show like this to continue learning and improving and making yourself better. So, if that’s you, then I think the best way for you to be able to do that, to differentiate yourself in your marketplace, is through those relationships and through those connections. And not to beat a dead horse here, but it’s always about the network, in my opinion, especially in an industry, in a field, where everybody is just as smart as you are, like, everybody’s gone through the same certification processes, everybody’s gone through and gotten their degree and their masters, and then maybe even PhD, or whatever it might be. So when you’re in those really highly educated fields, a lot of times you tend to focus really on the what you know, way more than the who you know, and the bottom line is somebody out there is making more money, having more opportunity, having more freedom, spending more time with their family, doing all the things that you want, on a higher level than you are, that is not as good at what you do as you are. But the reason that they’re there is because they got the opportunity, they got the value, they got the relationships, they have the network that provided them the space to be able to do those things at that level. So it’s not always about the what you know, and I think in a crowd like this, it’s really important to focus on the who you know for a little bit, and understand that that’s really where the majority of the success is going to come from now. Now that you’re competent at what you do, now that you’re good at what you do, now that you’re an expert at your craft, like, you have to focus now on the opportunity and the who you know, rather than the what you know.

[JOE]:
Oh, so awesome. Travis, if people want to connect with you, follow your work, what’s the best way for them to learn more about what you do?

[TRAVIS]:
Yeah, you can just go to travischappell.com. We keep that pretty updated and you can find both my podcasts on there, you can find a lot of the other stuff that I do on there, all my social links, my email, all that stuff is over at travischappell.com.

[JOE]:
Awesome. Thanks for being on the Practice of the Practice podcast.

[TRAVIS]:
Yes, sir. Thanks so much for having me, Joe.

[JOE]:
So what action are you going to take as a result of what Travis just shared with us? Because, I mean, why shouldn’t you meet your hero? Why shouldn’t you be leveling up and getting to that next level? Even just having a podcast is something that allows you to meet so many more people. So, if you want access to our free podcasting course, head on over to podcastlaunchschool.com and you’ll get access to our free nine-part course. As well, TherapyNotes is the sponsor of this podcast today, TherapyNotes is the premium electronic health records. They now have video as part of TherapyNotes, it’s so awesome. So, telehealth has never been easier. You’ve got your scheduling, you got your notes, all that in there. Use promo code JOE to get that discount. But if you want an even bigger discount, if you join Next Level Practice, you’ll get six months for free of TherapyNotes. They don’t offer that anywhere else. In fact, when you forward your receipt to me, I forward it to the team because they don’t even have a promo code. So, it is the best deal that’s out there for TherapyNotes, just forward that to me. If you’re not a Next Level Practice subscriber, all you have to do is go to practiceofthepractice.com/invite and you’ll get the invitation sent to you. Doors open on August 24th. We want to make sure that you are in there. If you have a practice that is less than $100,000 a year, this is for you. From the moment that you decided that you want to open a practice until the moment that you say, yep, I’m at six figures, Next Level Practice is what you need. Thanks so much for letting me into your ears and into your brain. Have an amazing week and I’ll talk to you soon.

Special thanks to the band Silence is Sexy for your intro music; we really like it. This podcast is designed to provide accurate, authoritative information in regard to the subject matter covered. It is given with the understanding that neither the host, the publisher, or the guests are rendering legal, accounting, clinical or other professional information. If you want a professional, you should find one.

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